Transport And Map Symbols

The Transport and Map Symbols block comprises a set of symbols limited to transportation and map symbols. Approximately half of the symbols in Unicode 6.0 derive from the emoji sets that are used by Japanese cell phone carriers.

Unicode blocks Transport And Map Symbols
Alternate names
Timeframe various
Regions
Type symbols
Alternate names left to right
Status living
Number of speakers
Languages Chinese, International
Main sources The Unicode Consortium. 2011. The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0, Mountain View, CA: The Unicode Consortium, p. 503 (Section 15.8).
Secondary sources
Proposal

Ugaritic

The Ugaritic script is an historical writing system that was used to write the Ugaritic language and other languages, including Hurrian. It is one of the cuneiform scripts and was used from around 1400 BCE until 12C BCE. It was discovered in Ugarit (modern Ras Shamra), Syria, in 1928.

Unicode blocks Ugaritic
Alternate names
Timeframe x-1400 to -12C
Regions East Asian
Type alphabet
Alternate names left to right
Status historical
Number of speakers 0
Languages Chinese, International
Main sources Pardee, Dennis. 2004. "Ugaritic" in The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the World’s Ancient Languages, ed. Roger Woodard. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 288-318.
Secondary sources Daniels, P. 1996. “Methods of Decipherment” in The World’s Writing Systems, ed. Peter T. Daniels & William Bright. New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 141-159.
Proposal http://std.dkuug.dk/JTC1/SC2/WG2/docs/n1640/n1640.htm

Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics

The Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics (UCAS) block represents a unification of various local syllabaries of Canada, based on the shapes of the characters. James Evans invented the syllabics in the late 1830s for the Algonquian languages. The script is used by several aboriginal communities throughout Canada, including speakers of the Algonquian, Inuktitut, and Athapascan language families. Today UCAS is also used by governmental agencies and in business, education, and media.

Unicode blocks Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics, Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics Extended
Alternate names
Timeframe 1830s to present
Regions East Asian
Type syllabary
Alternate names left to right
Status living
Number of speakers 199600
Languages Chinese, International
Main sources Nichols, J. 1996. “The Cree Syllabary” in The World’s Writing Systems, ed. Peter T. Daniels & William Bright. New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 599-611.
Secondary sources
Proposal

Vai

The Vai script is used for the Vai language, spoken in Liberia and Sierra Leone. It was devised by Dualu Bukele (Momolu Duwalu Bukele) of Liberia ca. 1830, and has been in use since then. Standardization efforts took place in 1899 and 1962. Vai speakers today also use the Arabic and Latin scripts.

Unicode blocks Vai
Alternate names
Timeframe 1830s to present
Regions East Asian
Type syllabary
Alternate names left to right
Status living
Number of speakers 75000
Languages Chinese, International
Main sources Singler, J. 1996. “Scripts of West Africa: Vai script” in The World’s Writing Systems, ed. Peter T. Daniels & William Bright. New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 593-598.
Secondary sources
Proposal http://std.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc2/wg2/docs/n2948.pdf, http://std.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc2/wg2/docs/n3081.pdf, http://std.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc2/wg2/docs/n3243.pdf

Variation Selectors

Variation selector characters provide a means to restrict the set of glyphs used to represent a particular character. A variation selector character follows a base character, but only affects the appearance of that base character. The sequence of variation selector and base character (called a "variation sequence") are defined in the file StandardizedVariants.txt in the Unicode Character Database, and ideographic variation sequences appear in the Ideographic Variation Database. Variation selectors first appeared in Unicode 3.2 in 2002. There are no glyphs encoded in this Unicode block.

Unicode blocks Variation Selectors, Variation Selectors Supplement
Alternate names
Timeframe 2002 to present
Regions
Type
Alternate names
Status
Number of speakers
Languages Chinese, International
Main sources The Unicode Consortium. 2011. The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0, defined by: The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0. Mountain View, CA: The Unicode Consortium, pp. 532-533 (Section 16.4).
Secondary sources
Proposal

Vedic Extensions

The Vedic Extensions set includes symbols that are used in Vedic texts. They appear in the four core texts of the Vedas (Samaveda, Yajurveda, Rigveda, and Atharvaveda) and in the prose text on Vedic ritual (Satapathabrahmana). The characters in this block may be used with Devanagari, as well as other Indic scripts. Though the language of the Rig Veda, the oldest of the Vedas, may date to as early as 1500 BCE, most extant written texts date to much later. The block also includes a set of characters used to indicate tone.

Unicode blocks Vedic Extensions
Alternate names
Timeframe ? to present
Regions East Asian
Type abugida
Alternate names left to right
Status liturgical
Number of speakers
Languages Chinese, International
Main sources The Unicode Consortium. 2011. The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0, defined by: The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0. Mountain View, CA: The Unicode Consortium, pp. 284-285 (Section 9.1).
Secondary sources
Proposal http://std.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc2/wg2/docs/n3488.pdf; http://std.dkuug.dk/jtc1/sc2/wg2/docs/n3383.pdf

Vertical Forms

The Vertical Forms block is made up of vertical punctuation compatibility characters that were needed to map to the Chinese standard GB 18030. For text laid out vertically, regular punctuation marks are used instead, with alternate glyphs provided by the font.

Unicode blocks Vertical Forms
Alternate names
Timeframe
Regions
Type
Alternate names
Status living
Number of speakers
Languages Chinese, International
Main sources The Unicode Consortium. 2011. The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0, defined by: The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0. Mountain View, CA: The Unicode Consortium, pp. 185, 200-201 (Section 6.2).
Secondary sources
Proposal

Yi

The traditional Yi script, known as Cuan or Wei, is an ideographic script used to write the Yi language, dating perhaps to the Tang Dynasty (618-907 CE). This script does not seem to derive from Han ideographs. The earliest known inscription is dated to 1485. Until modern times, the script was used primarily to write religious, medical, and geneological texts that were passed down by priests in individual villages, and hence was not used as a general means of communication between communities. To promote literacy in Yi, a standardized version of the traditional script that was used to write the Liangshan dialect of the Yi language (spoken in southern western China) was officially put forward.in 1980. The ideographic characters were transformed into a syllabary in this script and these appear in the Yi blocks in Unicode. However, the Yi block characters are not suitable for writing other dialects, only the Liangshan dialect. A different system using Latin letters, called "black Yi writing", was also devised for Yi in the 1950s and has been used by Yi Christians.

Unicode blocks Yi Radicals, Yi Syllables
Alternate names
Timeframe 7C? to present
Regions East Asian
Type syllabary
Alternate names variable
Status living
Number of speakers 2.1 million
Languages Chinese, International
Main sources Shi, Dingxu. 1996. "The Yi Script" in The World’s Writing Systems, ed. Peter T. Daniels & William Bright. New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 239-243.
Secondary sources GB 13134: Xinxi jiaohuanyong yiwen bianma zifuji (Yi coded character set for information interchange), [prepared by] Sichuansheng Minzushiwu Weiyuanhui. Beijing: Jishu Biaozhun Chubanshe (Technical Standards Press), 1991. (GB 13134-1991).
Proposal

Yijing Hexagram Symbols

The Yijing Hexagram Symbols is a block of Chinese symbols that first appeared in the text called Zhou Yi ("the Zhou Dynasty classic of change"), which may have originated about 1000 BCE. Today the book is known as the Yijing, I Ching, or Book of Changes. There are 64 hexagrams and they are still used today in many print and electronic publications.

Unicode blocks Yijing Hexagram Symbols
Alternate names
Timeframe x-1000 to present
Regions East Asian
Type symbols
Alternate names variable
Status living
Number of speakers
Languages Chinese, International
Main sources The Unicode Consortium. 2011. The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0, defined by: The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0. Mountain View, CA: The Unicode Consortium, p. 506 (Section 15.8).
Secondary sources
Proposal